Why Reading is Good for Children

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Why reading is good for children

Imagine a portal that can take you anywhere in the world, show you things you never knew existed, and expand your mind to new experiences. 

Reading can do all that and more. Margaret Atwood herself said: “I read for pleasure and that is the moment I learn the most.”

Children, who soak up the world around them while they are in the womb, are already on a journey to learning even before they are born. 

It is a process that is ongoing, which is why reading remains one of the most rewarding activities caregivers should incorporate into their children’s lives.

From age 0 to 4 children develop rapidly and supporting cognitive development by reading can accelerate learning.

Much of the stories aimed at children feature colourful drawings, pop-up illustrations, and literary devices that make their reading experience entertaining, as well as generate a physical response in their brain.

This is due to the fact that children are actively absorbing a new language while their eyes simultaneously take in bright colours, which in turn evokes an emotional response within them.

 

The power of reading

Reading is a powerful way to nurture a child’s creative thinking and imagination. Children can discover more things about the world and enhance their problem-solving skills. 

Interacting with children during reading can strengthen learning by asking questions such as: “What do you think happens next?” Allowing children to pick a book, turn the page or point to certain things that stands out engages them in a way that makes them want to continue reading.

There is so much happening when children are read to, and most of it is invisible to the human eye – making reading a phenomenal experience, despite it being a part of everyday life. 

It shouldn’t be taken for granted, and children may find a love for reading, if introduced at a young age

The importance of reading

Reading is an important part of a child’s education, whether they are attending school or learning at home. Getting them acquainted with reading as early as possible will allow them the chance to become more comfortable with it.

Studies have concluded that children who are exposed to reading are more likely to excel in their school studies. 

The early reading skills children will be able to pick up include: phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, reading comprehension, and fluency.

Creating a routine that includes reading will provide a useful consistency for them, because doing things in the same order everyday allows children to build their confidence and awareness, especially if they know what to expect.

Make reading a special event each day 

Children will start looking forward to reading if they can anticipate it being an everyday occurrence, and by enabling them to pick out books themselves or choosing stories they would be interested in (e.g. a fairytale about a princess) will make all the more enjoyable.

Humans are social creatures by nature and children will be able to achieve peak health by physically and emotionally bonding with their caregivers. 

Holding a child close while reading to them provides the type of intimate attention that will demonstrate how much they are loved and well-cared for.

This shared experience strengthens their bond and gives children a space to improve their social skills. 

Eye contact and explaining things to children during reading supports their development, even if they don’t quite understand the words, the interchange remains encouraging for them.

The advantage of reading

Reading offers a plethora of advantages for young minds, who are still so fresh to this world. Stories and poems can impact a child’s learning potential, as evidenced by research pointing out the improvement of their wellbeing and mental health thanks to regular reading.

So why not allow children to indulge in stories of brave knights or silly limericks involving talking birds? Their brains are eager for it and will thank you in the future.

 

Why reading is good for children Imagine a portal that can take you anywhere in the world, show you things you never knew existed, and expand your mind to new experiences. Reading can do all that and more. Margaret Atwood herself said: “I read for pleasure and that is the moment I learn the most.” Children, who soak up the world around them while they are in the womb, are already on a journey to learning even before they are born. It is a process that is ongoing, which is why reading remains one of the most rewarding activities caregivers should incorporate into their children’s lives. From age 0 to 4 children develop rapidly and supporting cognitive development by reading can accelerate learning. Much of the stories aimed at children feature colourful drawings, pop-up illustrations, and literary devices that make their reading experience entertaining, as well as generate a physical response in their brain. This is due to the fact that children are actively absorbing a new language while their eyes simultaneously take in bright colours, which in turn evokes an emotional response within them. The power of reading Reading is a powerful way to nurture a child’s creative thinking and imagination. Children can discover more things about the world and enhance their problem-solving skills. Interacting with children during reading can strengthen learning by asking questions such as: “What do you think happens next?” Allowing children to pick a book, turn the page or point to certain things that stands out engages them in a way that makes them want to continue reading. There is so much happening when children are read to, and most of it is invisible to the human eye - making reading a phenomenal experience, despite it being a part of everyday life. It shouldn’t be taken for granted, and children may find a love for reading, if introduced at a young age Reading is an important part of a child’s education, whether they are attending school or learning at home. Getting them acquainted with reading as early as possible will allow them the chance to become more comfortable with it. Studies have concluded that children who are exposed to reading are more likely to excel in their school studies. The early reading skills children will be able to pick up include: phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, reading comprehension, and fluency. Creating a routine that includes reading will provide a useful consistency for them, because doing things in the same order everyday allows children to build their confidence and awareness, especially if they know what to expect. Children will start looking forward to reading if they can anticipate it being an everyday occurrence, and by enabling them to pick out books themselves or choosing stories they would be interested in (e.g. a fairytale about a princess) will make all the more enjoyable. Humans are social creatures by nature and children will be able to achieve peak health by physically and emotionally bonding with their caregivers. Holding a child close while reading to them provides the type of intimate attention that will demonstrate how much they are loved and well-cared for. This shared experience strengthens their bond and gives children a space to improve their social skills. Eye contact and explaining things to children during reading supports their development, even if they don’t quite understand the words, the interchange remains encouraging for them. Reading offers a plethora of advantages for young minds, who are still so fresh to this world. Stories and poems can impact a child’s learning potential, as evidenced by research pointing out the improvement of their wellbeing and mental health thanks to regular reading. So why not allow children to indulge in stories of brave knights or silly limericks involving talking birds? Their brains are eager for it and will thank you in the future